Tagged: 5′-deoxyadenosylcobalamin

AdoCbl + LRRK2 = modulation

 

Approximately 1 person with Parkinson’s in every 100 will have a genetic variation in a specific section of their DNA that is referred to as LRRK2 – pronounced ‘lark 2’. The variation results in changes to the activity of the LRRK2 protein, and these changes are suspected of influencing the course of LRRK2-associated Parkinson’s.

Numerous biotech companies are now developing LRRK2 targetting agents that will modulate the activity of the LRRK2 protein.

Recently, however, a research report was published which points towards a potentially accessible method of LRRK2 modulation – one of the active forms of vitamin B12 – and if this research can be independently replicated, it may provide certain members of the Parkinson’s community with another means of dealing with the condition.

In today’s post, we will look at what LRRK2 is, review the new research, and discuss what could happen next.

 


This is Sergey Brin.

You may have heard of him – he was one of the founders of a small company called “Google”. Apparently it does something internet related.

Having made his fortune changing the way we find stuff, he is now turning his attention to other projects.

One of those other projects is close to our hearts: Parkinson’s.

Why is he interested in Parkinson’s?

In 1996, Sergey’s mother started experiencing numbness in her hands. Initially it was believed to be a bit of RSI (Repetitive strain injury). But then her left leg started to drag. In 1999, following a series of tests and clinical assessments, Sergey’s mother was diagnosed with Parkinson’s.

The Brin Family – Sergey and his mother on the right. Source: CS

It was not the first time the family had been affected by the condition – Sergey’s late aunt had also had Parkinson’s.

Given this coincidental family history of this particular condition, both Sergey and his mother decided to have their DNA scanned for any genetic errors (also called ‘variants’ or ‘mutations’) that are associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s. And they discovered that they were both carrying a genetic variation in a gene (a section of DNA that provides the instructions for making a protein) called PARK8 – one of the Parkinson’s-associated genes (Click here to read more about the genetics of Parkinson’s and the PARK genes).

The PARK8 gene is also known as Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (or LRRK2 – pronounced ‘lark 2’).

What is LRRK2?

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