The Anavex results

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This week some encouraging clinical trial results were announced by a biotech firm called Anavex Life Sciences.

The company had been testing their lead experimental therapy – a Sigma-1 receptor agonist called ANAVEX2-73 (also known as blarcamesine) – in 132 people with Parkinson’s disease dementia over a 14 week period.

The results are rather encouraging: significantly positive outcomes in both cognitive and motor symptoms.

In today’s post, we will explain what exactly “Sigma-1 receptor agonist” means, discuss what Parkinson’s disease dementia is, and review what we currently know about the results of the trial.

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Source: Pumpingmarvellous

A lot of clinical trials for disease modification in Parkinson’s are focused on targeting well known proteins that are believed to be associated with underlying biology of the condition, such as alpha synuclein, LRRK2, and GBA. We discuss these on a regular basis here on the SoPD.

There are, however, a large number of trials investigating less well known targets.

And this week we received news that one of these clinical trials had some positive results.

Source: Thestreet

The study was conducted by the biotech company Anavex Life Sciences and it involved their lead experimental therapy ANAVEX2-73 (also known as blarcamesine).

ANAVEX2-73 is a Sigma-1 receptor agonist.

What does that mean?

Continue reading “The Anavex results”

Can sigma-1 get it done?

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An Australian charity seeking to find disease modifying therapies for Parkinson’s – The Shake It Up Australia Foundation – has announced a commitment to partially fund a clinical trial with a biotech firm called Anavex Life Sciences.

The trial will focus on a drug called ANAVEX2-73 (also known as ‘blarcamesine’). This experimental treatment is a Sigma-1 receptor agonist

In today’s post, we will discuss what the Sigma-1 receptor does, we will review some of the Parkinson’s research that has been conducted on this protein, and we will discuss what we know about the potential trial.

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A man on a mission. Source: Goulburnpost

The gentleman in the photo above is named Clyde Campbell.

True blue Aussie, innovative robotics engineer, keen sportsman, and all round nice guy.

Clyde also has Parkinson’s, which was diagnosed in 2009 after he noticed a tremor in his left hand while holding notes at a business meeting. After dealing with the initial shock of this life changing event, he turned his attention to doing something about it.

Clyde simply could not sit still and not do anything about his situation, so he grabbed the bull by the horns and decided to shake things up.In 2011, Clyde (and his brother Greg) founded a charity called the Shake It Up Australia Foundation:

Since its founding, the foundation has supported 38 Parkinson’s research projects across 12 institutes, with over AUS$11.5 million in funding. In addition, the organisation is a key partner in the Australian Parkinson’s Mission (Click here to read a previous SoPD post on this project).

To learn more about Clyde, watch this video where he shares his story:

This week the Shake It Up Australia Foundation made a big announcement.

What did they say?

Continue reading “Can sigma-1 get it done?”