Tagged: unbiased

An exercise in expectations: Exenatide III

 

In August 2017, the results of a Phase II double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial investigating whether the diabetes drug Exenatide (aka Bydureon) can be repurposed for the treatment of Parkinson’s were published.

Despite the fact that the study did not meet most of its end points, the Parkinson’s community got very excited about one of the results: The exenatide treated group demonstrated a stabilisation of their motor features over the 48 week trial, while the control group continued to worsen.

Over night, for many in the community, the hypothetical (a “disease-halting medication”) suddenly become a possibility. After such a long trail of negative clinical trial results, it was a very human and natural response for everyone to get excited. But with the news this month, that the Phase III exenatide clinical trial is about to start, the community needs to curb that excitement in order for a proper evaluation of the drug to take place.

In today’s post, we will look at the details of the new Phase III clinical trial for Exenatide and discuss why it is important to manage expections.

 


 

Here on the SoPD website we are often discussing novel potentially disease modifying therapies for Parkinson’s. And it is rather staggering the number and range of different approaches currently being tested on Parkinson’s.

And I am often asked, “Simon, if you were a betting man, which one I would put my money on? Which one are you expecting to work?

Now, before we go on dear reader, please understand that my answer to this question will problably disappoint you.

You see, I do not expect any of these experimental treatments being clinically tested to work.

WHAT THE?!?

Now, before you turn off, please let me explain – because this is important (it is not click-bait).

Ok, I’m listening. Why don’t you expect any of these treatments to work?!?

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