Tagged: wristband

Monitoring Parkinson’s: Doctor, my glasses are listening to us

 

An important aspect of developing new potentially ‘curative’ treatments for Parkinson’s is our ability to accurately test and evaluate them.

Current methods of assessing Parkinson’s are basic at best (UPDRS and brain imaging), and if we do not improve our ability to measure Parkinson’s, many of those novel treatments will fail the clinical trial process and forever remain just “potentially” curative.

Glasses are a wearable device that the majority of us take for granted. But two technology companies have announced that they are partnering up to focus their combined efforts on making a pair of glasses that could help improve the lives of people with Parkinson’s. 

One company focuses on tracking facial expressions, while the other analyses audio. 

In today’s post, we will look at how these technologies could be applied to Parkinson’s, and discuss what the companies have planned.

 


Looking good. Source: 1zoom

An interesting fact:

Approximately 60% of western populations wear glasses, contact lenses or use some other reading/visual aid (Source). And as we age, this percentage only increases – with the over 75 year olds representing a solid collection within the bespectacled crowd (see graph below).

More women than men wear glasses. Source: CBS

I am in the majority.

But mostly for aesthetic reasons (they make me look smarter than I actually am).

Ok, but what does this have to do with Parkinson’s?

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