Tagged: cyclooxygenase

Aspirin: Barking up the right tree?

 

Aspirin is one of the oldest drugs in medical use today.

Recently researchers noticed something interesting about ‘low doses’ of aspirin that could have implications for Parkinson’s: It raises the amount of dopamine in the brain

Specifically, low doses of aspirin triggers an increase in the levels of an enzyme called tyrosine hydroxylase, which is involved in the production of chemical dopamine. Given that levels of dopamine are severely reduced in the brain of a person with Parkinson’s, this new result is kind of interesting.

In today’s post, we will have a look at what aspirin and tyrosine hydroxylase are, what the new research results report, and what this could mean for the Parkinson’s community.

 


Source: Ancientpages

The Ebers Papyrus (also known as the also known as Papyrus Ebers) is considered one of the most oldest medicinal “encyclopedias”.

It outlines 700 Egyptian medicinal formulas and remedies dating back to circa 1550 BC. We know nothing about who wrote the document (even the source of the papyrus is unknown – it may have been found with a mummy in the El-Assasif district of the Theban necropolis).

One thing is clear though: the people who wrote it were a very far sighted bunch.

Interestingly, the papyrus mentions use of Willow bark and Myrtle to treat fever and pain. Both of these plants are rich in Salicylic acid.

What is Salicylic acid?

It is an active precursor (or metabolite) of acetylsalicylic acid – which is also known as ‘Aspirin’.

Source: Labmuffin

What exactly is aspirin?

Continue reading