Tagged: DaTscan

Is it time to back NAC?

 

A lot of Parkinson’s research is focused on antioxidants – molecules that can reduce the level of stress a cell is under when it is not feeling well.

One of the most widely discussed antioxidants on Parkinson’s online forums is a molecule called Nacetylcysteine (or NAC).

Recently, the results of a small clinical trial – in which NAC was administered to people with Parkinson’s – have been published. The results are rather interesting.

In today’s post, we will discuss what NAC is, why it is important in the context of Parkinson’s, and we will look at what the new clinical trial report suggests about this molecule.

 


NAC. Source: Draxe

One question I get asked a lot is “What do you think of NAC?”

And I usually answer with my standard “I’m not a clinician, just an ex-research scientist. I can’t talk about medications or supplements, etc…”

But recently some interesting new data has been published regarding NAC and it’s kind of interesting.

What is NAC?

N-acetylcysteine (or NAC; also known as Acetylcysteine – commercially named Mucomyst) is a prodrug – that is a compound that undergoes a transformation when ingested by the body and then begins exhibiting pharmacological effects.

Acetylcysteine-2D-skeletalAcetylcysteine. Source: Wikimedia

Acetylcysteine serves as a prodrug to a protein called L-cysteine, and – just as L-dopa is an intermediate in the production of dopamine – L-cysteine is an intermediate in the production of another protein called glutathione.

If you remember nothing else today, remember this: Acetylcysteine allows for increased production of glutathione.

And what is glutathione?

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