Tagged: hypothesis

Parkinson’s: When evolution leaves parts of us behind?

 

Recently researchers have proposed an interesting idea for why Parkinson’s is a distinctly human condition: There are parts of our brains that have not kept up with evolution, and as we live longer those areas become strained which ultimately results in the features of Parkinson’s.

It’s a really interesting idea – one which could have major implications.

In today’s post, we will review the new proposal and consider how we could use it in our approach to therapeutic interventions.

 


2020 Tesla Roadster. Source: Motortrend

By nature and design, I am not a car person.

If I can actually fit in the car (I am rather tall) and it gets me from A to B, it’s a great car. I don’t really care what it looks like, because I usually look ridiculous in the more sporty versions (my knees up around my ears…). As long as it gets from A to B, I’m happy.

Having said that, I do appreciate the technological advancements that are being made by companies like Tesla (I mean seriously, their Roadster – pictured above – is an electric car that does 0-60 mph in 1.9-seconds, quarter-mile in less than 9-second, a 250-plus-mph top speed, and an all-electric range of 620-mile! All of those statistics are incredible!).

It is amazing the evolutionary process that automobiles have gone through.

The first petrol engine-propelled car invented by Karl Benz. Source: Oxfordsurfaces

Every aspect of these vehicles has changed over time. From the wheels to the engine and from petrol to electric based cars, each component has been adapted across the decades to keep up with the needs of its environment.

Researchers are now wondering if the same can be said for our brains. And just recently some scientists have questioned whether some evolutionary design faults could explain why humans develop Parkinson’s.

What?!? What do you mean?

Continue reading