Tagged: malaria

A new reason to hate mosquitos?

 

Theories of viral agents as possible causal (or influencing) factors in Parkinson’s have long existed.

This week a research team from Colorado in the USA published a new report demonstrating that mice infected with a mosquito-borne alphavirus (called Western equine encephalitis virus) develop Parkinson’s-like features.

These features include the loss of dopamine neurons, increased neuroinflammation, locomotor issues, and the wide spread presence of aggregated protein (all classical hallmarks of the Parkinsonian brain).

In today’s post, we will look at what mosquito-borne alphaviruses are, what this new study found, and how the results could help us to better understand some cases of Parkinson’s.

 


Electron micro photograph of Influenza viruses. Source: Neuro-hemin

Between January 1918 and December 1920, there were two terrible outbreaks of an influenza virus.

The event became known as the 1918 flu pandemic.

Approximately 500 million people across the globe were infected by the H1N1 influenza virus during this period, and there were approximately 50 to 100 million associated death.

Now, to put that into perspective for you, that was basically 3-5% of the world’s population at that time.

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1918 Spanish flu. Source: Chronicle

At the time, much of the world was blind to these events. Given that this pandemic occurred during World War 1, censors limited the media coverage of the pandemic in many countries in order to try and maintain some sort of morale (very thoughtful of them).

The Spanish media, however, were not censored and this is why the 1918 pandemic is often referred to as the ‘Spanish flu’.

But at the same time that H1N1 influenza virus was causing havoc, a Romanian born neurologist named Constantin von Economo noticed something interesting.

What did he notice?

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