The modification of acidification

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In Parkinson’s research, a great deal of the attention is focused on a handful of proteins that are associated with Parkinson’s. The majority of this knowledge has come from the discovery of genetic variations being apparent in some member of the PD community.

The proteins (and biological pathways) underlying these genetic variations include alpha synuclein, LRRK2, PARKIN and GBA – all of which have been discussed on this website. But scientists have identified over 80 different regions of DNA that are associated with Parkinson’s and only recently have some of the proteins associated with these other regions of DNA been investigated.

One of these proteins is particularly interesting. It’s called TMEM175. And recently published research has provided new insights into this protein.

In today’s post, we will look at what is known about TMEM175 and discuss how biotech companies are therapeutically modulating it as a potential novel treatment for Parkinson’s.

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Source: Sciencetrends

Lysosomes are a key component of the waste disposal/recycling system of our cells.

They are small bags that are full of digestive enzymes that help to break down material inside of cells. Sometimes that material is newly imported from outside of the cell, while other times it may be old proteins that need to be disposed of.

Lysosomes provide the digestive enzymes for the job of breaking down the material.
Lysosomes

How lysosomes work. Source: Prezi

We haver discussed lysosomes in previous posts in more depth (Click here to read that SoPD post) – but understand that they are an absolutely critical component of normal biological function inside of cells.

Got it. What do they have to do with Parkinson’s?

Continue reading “The modification of acidification”

IBD+TNF AB ≠ PD?

The cryptic title of this post will hopefully make sense by the time you have finished reading the material present here.

This week, new research from the USA points towards an increased risk of Parkinson’s (PD) for people that suffer from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). 

That same research, however, also points towards a clinically available treatment that appears to reduce the risk of Parkinson’s in individuals affected by inflammatory bowel disease. That treatment being: anti–tumor necrosis factor antibodies (TNF AB). Is that title making sense yet? If not, read on.

In today’s post, we will outline what inflammatory bowel disease is, review what the new research found, and discuss what is known about TNF in Parkinson’s. 


Inflammatory bowel disease. Source: Symprove

Inflammatory bowel disease (or IBD) is one of these umbrella terms that is used to refer to a group of inflammatory conditions of the large and small intestine:

The large and small intestine. Source: Adam

The symptoms of IBD can include abdominal pain, diarrhoea, vomiting, rectal bleeding, severe internal cramps/muscle spasms in the region of the pelvis, and weight loss.

The most common forms of IBD are Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

There has been an increased incidence of IBD since World War II, which could be associated with increased awareness and reporting of the condition, but it could also be linked with increases in meat consumption (Click here to read more about this). For example, in 2015, an estimated 1.3% of U.S. adults (3 million) were diagnosed with IBD, which was a large increase on the levels in 1999 (0.9% or 2 million adults – Source: CDC).

This is delightful, but what does it have to do with Parkinson’s?

So this week, an interesting study was published on the Journal of the American Medical Association – Neurology edition website:

Continue reading “IBD+TNF AB ≠ PD?”

The road ahead: Parkinson’s research in 2018

The great ice hockey player Wayne Gretzky once said “A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be” (the original quote actually came from his father, Walter). 

At the start of each year, it is a useful practise to layout what is planned for the next 12 months. This can help us better anticipate where ‘the puck’ will be, and allow us to prepare for things further ahead.

2017 was an incredible year for Parkinson’s research, and there is a lot already in place to suggest that 2018 is going to be just as good (if not better).

In this post, we will lay out what we can expect over the next 12 months with regards to the Parkinson’s-related clinical trials research of new therapies.


Charlie Munger (left) and Warren Buffett. Source: Youtube

Many readers will be familiar with the name Warren Buffett.

The charming, folksy “Oracle of Omaha” is one of the wealthiest men in the world. And he is well known for his witticisms about investing, business and life in general.

Warren Buffett. Source: Quickmeme

He regularly provides great one liners like:

“We look for three things [in good business leaders]: intelligence, energy, and integrity. If they don’t have the latter, then you should hope they don’t have the first two either. If someone doesn’t have integrity, then you want them to be dumb and lazy”

“Work for an organisation of people you admire, because it will turn you on. I always worry about people who say, ‘I’m going to do this for ten years; and if I really don’t like it very much, then I’ll do something else….’ That’s a little like saving up sex for your old age. Not a very good idea”

“Choosing your heroes is very important. Associate well, marry up and hope you find someone who doesn’t mind marrying down. It was a huge help to me”

Mr Buffett is wise and a very likeable chap.

Few people, however, are familiar with his business partner, Charlie Munger. And Charlie is my favourite of the pair.

Continue reading “The road ahead: Parkinson’s research in 2018”