Tagged: direct

Direct dopamine delivery

     

In the Parkinsonian brain, there is a severe reduction in a substance called dopamine. Reduced levels of this chemical are associated with the appearance of the motor features of Parkinson’s.

Dopamine replacement therapies has been the front line therapy for the condition for the last 50 years. But long-term use of drugs like L-dopa are associated with the rise of motor complications, like dyskinesias.

In the an effort to correct this, researchers in France have recently developed a method of continuously and directly delivering dopamine to the brain. They have now published the results of a study evaluating the safety and feasibility of this approach in a primate model of Parkinson’s.

In today’s post, we will discuss what dopamine is, review the results of this new research, and explore what might happen next for this new potential treatment method.

 


Prof David Devos. Source: Youtube

This is Dr David Devos.

He is Professor of medical pharmacology at University of Lille (France), world-renowned Parkinson’s researchers, a passionate advocate for the Parkinson’s community, and on top of all that he’s a really (and I mean REALLY) nice guy as well.

Recently, his research group (in collaboration with other scientists) published a report presenting a novel way of treating Parkinson’s, that he is now hoping to take to the clinic.

Here is the report:

Title: Intraventricular dopamine infusion alleviates motor symptoms in a primate model of Parkinson’s disease.
Authors: Moreau C, Rolland AS, Pioli E, Li Q, Odou P, Barthelemy C, Lannoy D, Demailly A, Carta N, Deramecourt V, Auger F, Kuchcinski G, Laloux C, Defebvre L, Bordet R, Duce J, Devedjian JC, Bezard E, Fisichella M, David D.
Journal: Neurobiol Dis. 2020 Mar 20:104846.
PMID: 32205254                    (This report is OPEN ACCESS if you would like to read it)

In this study, the researchers wanted to explore how to directly deliver a chemical called dopamine to the brain.

What is dopamine?

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DBS2.0: Look mum, no electrodes!

DBS


Deep brain stimulation is a surgical procedure that can provide immediate motor-related benefits to people with Parkinson’s disease.

The approach involves placing electrodes deep inside the brain. This procedure requires invasive surgery and there are no guarantees that it will actually work for everybody.

Recently, researchers at MIT have devised a new technique that could one day allow for a new kind of deep brain stimulation – one without the electrodes and surgery.

In today’s post we will review the science behind deep brain stimulation and the research leading to non-invasive deep brain stimulation.


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Source: Youtube

In 2002, deep brain stimulation (or DBS) was granted approval for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The historical starting point for this technology, however, dates quite far back…

Further back than many of you may be thinking actually…

In his text “Compositiones medicamentorum” (46 AD), Scribonius Largo, head physician of the Roman emperor Claudius, first suggested using pulses of electricity to treat afflictions of the mind.

Caludius

Roman emperor Claudius. Source: Travelwithme

He proposed that the application of the electric ray (Torpedo nobiliana) on to the cranium could be a beneficial remedy for headaches (and no, I’m not kidding here – this was high tech at the time!).

800px-Atlantic_torpedo_(_Torpedo_nobiliana_)

Torpedo nobiliana. Source: Wikipedia

These Atlantic fish are known to be very capable of producing an electric discharge (approximately 200 volts). The shock is quite severe and painful – the fish get their name from the Latin “torpere,” meaning to be stiffened or paralysed, referring specifically to the response of those who try to pick these fish up – but the shock is not fatal.

Now, whether Largo was ever actually allowed to apply this treatment to the august ruler is unknown, and beyond the point. What matters here is that physicians have been considering and using this approach for a long time. And more recently, the application of it has become more refined.

What is deep brain stimulation?

The modern version of deep brain stimulation is a surgical procedure in which electrodes are implanted into the brain. It is used to treat a variety of debilitating symptoms, particularly those associated with Parkinson’s disease, such as tremor, rigidity, and walking problems.

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