Tagged: Roche

Making sense of antisense

 

Recent regulator approvals and exciting new preclinical data has refocused attention on a treatment approach for genetic conditions that has travelled a long and winding road towards clinical use.

Antisense oligonucleotides represent a method of altering protein levels at the post transcriptional level – it basically stops certain RNAs from being translated into protein.

And recently, a new clinical trial has been registered which will explore the use of this treatment approach in people with Parkinson’s.

In today’s post, we will look at what antisense oligonucleotides are, how they work, what research has been conducted in the context of Parkinson’s, and some of the limitations of this approach that still exist.

 


Source: Youtube

Spinal muscular atrophy (or SMA) is a genetic disorder that results in the degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord. This leads to progressive weakening and atrophy of muscules, ultimately leaving sufferers paralysed. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene.

It is a terrible condition that starts in very young children and has an incidence approaching 1:10,000 live births.

Luckily, novel therapies are being developed to deal with this condition, and in 2016, the US FDA approved a new treatment – following rather dramatic clinical trial results – called Nusinersen. This new therapy has caused a great deal of excitement as it basically halted the progression of SMA in many cases.

And a recent long term report highlights some of these very impressive results:

Title: Nusinersen in later-onset spinal muscular atrophy: Long-term results from the phase 1/2 studies.
Authors: Darras BT, Chiriboga CA, Iannaccone ST, Swoboda KJ, Montes J, Mignon L, Xia S, Bennett CF, Bishop KM, Shefner JM, Green AM, Sun P, Bhan I, Gheuens S, Schneider E, Farwell W, De Vivo DC; ISIS-396443-CS2/ISIS-396443-CS12 Study Groups.
Journal: Neurology. 2019 May 21;92(21):e2492-e2506.
PMID: 31019106                (This report is OPEN ACCESS if you would like to read it)

Most importantly, Nusinersen is having real impact on the children who are affected by this condition:

Interesting, but what exactly is Nusinersen?

It is an antisense oligonucleotide.

What are antisense oligonucleotides?

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The 2019 ADPD meeting

 

On the 26-31st March, the 14th International Conference on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases (or ADPD meeting) was held in Lisbon, Portugal.

For 5 days – between 8:30am and 7:30pm each day – over 4000 researchers were able to attend lectures of new results and ideas, in any of 8 different auditoriums. Alternatively, they could wander among hundreds of research posters.

It was a marathon effort, however, for all attendees. And a great deal of new results were shared.

In today’s post, we will discussed what was presented at the 2019 ADPD meeting and what was actually learnt.

 


Lisbon. Source: stmed

Lisbon is a city, midway down the western coast of the Iberian Peninsula.

It is home to a little over 500,000 people (3 million in the wider metropolitan area), and it serves as the capital city for the Portuguese people.

The Castelo de Sao Jorge, rises above Lisbon. Source: Wikipedia

Interestingly, it is the 2nd oldest European capital city (after Athens), and has had a rich and fascinating history given its strategic location. But on the 1st November 1755, 20% of the population were killed and 85% of the city’s structures were destroyed by a terrible earthquake and subsequent tsunami, which resulted in the vast majority of the city being rebuilt.

The ‘new city’ is laid out in bairros de Lisboa (neighbourhoods of Lisbon) across a hilly landscape, providing views of the River Tagus at every vantage point. And while walking the steep cobblestoned streets is delightful, there is a system of vintage public trams that can take a lot of the leg work out of the effort.

Source: Portugaltravelguide

During the last week of March 2019, Lisbon was the site of the ADPD meeting.

What is the ADPD meeting?

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